How News Got Social

In 2011, The New York Times‘ circulation reached 1.2 million people.

The Wall Street Journal’s circulation reached 2.11 million people.

Facebook’s circulation reached 500 million people.

It’s not a leap to say that news organizations would love to harness the power of Facebook, unfortunately few have found an effective means to do so. However, for those looking to partner with the social media giant, the success of the Washington Post Social Reader is one that cannot be ignored.

Launched in 2011, the Washington Post Social Reader Facebook application is currently used by 11 million people. It instantly shares articles you read with your Facebook friends, and shares articles your Facebook friends read with you, creating a “socially powered newswire of intriguing articles.”  It also recommends other articles based on what articles a user has previously read, allowing for a better understanding of a “user’s preferences with repeat usage.”

Most importantly however, is the fact the Social Reader allows users to look at full articles without leaving their Facebook page. Users also don’t have to pay for the articles they view.

The Washington Post Social Reader has no advertisements. For many stories, it doesn’t even direct the user to content from its own site but instead uses content from partner sites like Mashable, the Associated Press, and Global Post. The average individual may question what the Washington Post may even get out of an application like Social Reader, but the answer is data. When users get the Social Reader application, it asks for permissions, but more importantly specific permissions.

Like any good app, it doesn’t ask for information the creating organization doesn’t need. For example, since the Washington Post is an organization built on its readership, it has no need for information dealing with a user’s Facebook pictures or status updates. Asking for only specific information, instead of access to everything, shortens the number of permissions, which may make users feel more at ease with the app they are allowing on their Facebook page.

Since the Social Reader shares articles a user reads with their Facebook friends, privacy settings are included to where users can decide what groups of their friends are allowed to see the articles a user reads. This impacts the reach of the Social Reader, because not only can it be limited to certain groups of friends, but if a friend wants to read an article that a user’s Social Reader shares with them, they must also allow the Social Reader app.

It is also important to note that by using the Washington Post Social Reader, users are automatically upgraded to Facebook Timeline, the new version of a Facebook profile, which allows users to share more information about themselves over the course of their life.

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One Comment on “How News Got Social”


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